Dating for 3 years and no proposal

But I am sympathetic to the fact that a woman has more incentive to make those 3, 4, 5 years invested actually convert.

Because starting over with someone new takes time, too.

So she’s more likely to give him a third or fourth chance.

Which is why it’s incumbent upon us men to not exploit that leniency.

I’m calling to task the men who have been on the fence since very early in the relationship, and yet stay in that same position for years on end, and then finally call it off later for the same misgivings they had years earlier. To me there’s a statute of limitations to which you can cite a particular issue as the reason for exit, and the clock starts ticking the first time you mentally decide, “Hmm, this is a pretty big problem for me.”Once you have that concern, I think, as a man, you have a specific moral obligation to be forthcoming about it and do one of two things: 1) raise your concerns with your partner and attempt to reconcile them, or 2) recognize that, if you think this incompatibility is not “fix-able,” that, you have to get the check and head for the door.

If she’s looking for “the one” and thinks you’re it, it’s a crime of the heart to stay with her if you know you’re inevitably going to leave.

But I think part of being a “good man” (actually, just being an adult) is to act in union with your inner beliefs.

I’m calling to task the men who have been on the fence since very early in the relationship, and yet stay in that same position for years on end, and then finally call it off later for the same misgivings they had years earlier.And allow yourself, too, the chance to find a better fit.Now, I realize, of course, that women perhaps bear the ultimate responsibility of staying with a guy who has one foot out the door, abusing their time.I knew I was going to be the “asshole” and put it off as long as possible.But let’s say you begin dating a woman when you’re both 30.